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Lesson Plan #1

 

 

 

Causes of the

American Revolution

 

Unit Plan

 

 

Karina Alvarez

EDEL 108C

December 2005


 

Fifth grade Unit Plan

1. Essential Question:

What caused disagreements between people that lead to the American Revolution?

2. Broad Standard / Substandard:

5.5 Students explain the causes of the American Revolution.

5.5.1 Understand how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution (e.g., the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, taxes on tea, coercive Acts).

3. Behavior Objective:

TSWBAT restate how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the American Revolution by designing flyers that outline and summarize events or terms assigned and through a debate presenting the colonists perspective and the British perspective. 

TSWBAT summarize The Sugar Act, The Stamp Act, The Quartering Act and The Townshend Duties.

4. Sub questions:

What political interest brought about the American Revolution?

What economic interest brought about the American Revolution?

5. Assessment:

The assessment for this unit will be based on the group flyers and a quick write for the first day. A T-chart assignment that the students will prepare to use for the debate will also be graded, as well as their participation in the debate on the second day. See attached scoring rubric for specific grading criteria on the debate.

 Teaching Strategy:

Day 1

Title: 

Why the Fight for Freedom? 

Materials: 

         Play money

         Visuals:

The study prints from: The American      Experience Smithsonian  Institution, Colonial Years, Scholastic Magazines,  Inc.,  New York, N.Y., 1975.

Differentiations/Adaptations:                                                                                                                        All students will be able to participate and understand the game used to introduce this unit.  This introductory activity is extraordinary cleaver and will get everyone’s attention.  This is especially important because English learners will also be able to understand the concept being taught in this lesson.  Furthermore, there are visuals to assist with the vision of the colonial era.  Lastly there is an artistic group activity to focus on the multiple intelligence range of the class.    

LESSON OUTLINE

Setting of Context

            This lesson begins the unit plan for the causes of the American Revolution.  Students should have studied the 13 colonies and have an understanding of the tensions that were building as the colonists became more dissatisfied with the mother country.  The students should have studied the causes and outcomes of the French and Indian War.  The following lesson will allow the students to personally understand how the colonist felt by the assimilation in today’s activity.

Motivation:

            Before the students come in, take the pictures mentioned in the materials section and set them up around the room.  As soon as the students come in walk around and hand out play money to everyone.  Then announce a new class rule.  State that each time a student moves without permission, the entire class will lose one dollar.  Begin to enact the new rule as this lesson begins and collect money every time someone moves.

Read the following passage simultaneously:

            “Imagine that it is 1776 and you are an American in the British colonies (Point out that there are pictures set up around the room to help their imagination, this of course will have to involve movement so make sure to collect money from the students).  You are not happy with the British government that rules you.  You do not like the laws that you are being forced to obey.  You feel that the taxes that you are being charged are unfair”.

            After a few minutes of the new rule, stop and ask the students how they feel about the new rule and about the money being taken away.  Allow for a discussion.  Most students will probably feel that the rule is unfair.  After discussion, chart the student’s reasons as to why the rule is unfair.

 Development

            Now allow the students to stand up and look at the pictures that are posted around the room so that they see and identify with the colonial era.  This is also helpful for ELL students and for those who rely on visuals to enhance their imagination.  Explain each picture.

Picture #1. (2-11) Spinning was an important home occupation for colonial woman.   

Picture #2.(2-21) A view of fishing for curing and drying cod at the New found land.

Picture #3. (2-25) The building of Savannah Georgia in 1733.

Picture #4. (2-37) Hemp was grown and processed as a substitute for flax to make fiber for sails and rope in the colonial period.

Picture #5. (2-40) the American School, another profession in this era

Picture #6. (2-5) Fruits and Vegetables from the Americas

Picture #7. (2-20) Lady and Gentleman of the Ten Eyck Family in early 18th century costume.

            Now that the students have an understanding of why the Colonists were angry at their mother land divide the class in 4 groups.  Each group will be given an activity card that will have the event they are to summarize and construct flyers for.  The cards will have the following terms: 

The Sugar Act

The Stamp Act

The Quartering Act

The Townshend Duties 

Each group will be allowed to use their textbooks, other research materials and the Internet to get more information on their term/event.  They will then prepare two flyers one for the colonist (or colonist point of view) and one for the British (or British point of view) of an outline and or summary that defines or illustrates their term.  Dates are important and also a description of whom these events/terms affected the most.  These will be shared with the class and will play a key role for tomorrow’s debate.

Critical thinking questions (quick write up)

1)  What went through your head as the teacher imposed the new rule in the classroom?

2)  How did it feel to receive money and then get it taken away with out agreeing to pay?

3)  How does this assimilation relate to what the colonists where going through after the French     

      and Indian war?

4)  Do you think the Colonists reacted against the unfair taxes forced upon them?  If so, in what way?

 Assessment

            The Students will be assessed in many ways through out this unit.  First of all a diagnostic assessment will be conducted orally through oral questioning and through the students’ reaction to the introduction.  Then the assessment for this first lesson plan will be the flyers that each group will produce and the quick write up. 

                                                      Day 2

Title:

Putting Your Money Where Your Mouth Is

Materials: 

         Video of a classroom debate (any video will work so that those students who are not familiar with debates may see how a debate is done).                                Video:                                                                                                                 Debate Made Easy DVD.  Author: Mercedes Smith, Bishop  Kenny High School, Jacksonville, FL. School Library Journal, June 2001

Differentiations/Adaptations: 

            The video in this lesson is helpful so that the students familiarize with the debate process.  Some students are visual learners others might be verbal or logical.  For this reason, a video on a debate will be shown and a hand out of the debate instructions along with a graphic organizer for the debate will be distributed so that all students understand the assignment.  It is important to allow all students to learn the debate process so that they contribute to their team.                                                                                                             

LESSON OUTLINE

Setting of Context:

                        The British were victorious in the French and Indian War and the colonists no longer felt threatened by the French.  Many colonists wanted to explore the territory west of the Mississippi.  The war left Great Britain with many debts, and felt that the colonists should help to pay for these debts.  The British government began to charge the colonists taxes to help get back the money that was spent during the war.  The Americans were not happy with these new taxes like The Stamp Act that required that they pay a tax on things like newspapers and other documents.  The Americans rebelled against the new taxes and felt they were unfair because they did not help make the tax law in the first place.  The British made these laws in a place called Parliament where leaders met to make the laws.  These leaders did not include any Americans and they felt that because they were not represented, the laws were unfair. 

            The British passed more laws like the Tea Tax that forced Americans to pay a tax on the tea that they drank.  This made the colonists very angry.  They no longer wanted to be ruled by Great Britain.  They decided that it was time to take action. 

Motivation: 

            Tell the students that they are going to be having a real life classroom debate.  The students will be given a point of view for their debate of either British or Colonist.  Tell the students that every time someone participates in a debate they need to research their topics to be well prepared.  In this case, their information will be partially given to them by their peers through the flyer assignment from yesterday.  Ask the students to think of their topic and have them place themselves in the shoes of the Colonists.  Now ask them to place themselves in the shoes of the British.  This should have them thinking about both sides like looking at the two different sides of a coin.   

Development:

            After sharing the flyers with the class divide the class in half, have the students create a Pro and Con chart of their point of view for their debate as either a British or a Colonist (hand out the graphic organizer for guidance).   The chart should include reasons for wanting independence or for remaining loyal to Britain based on the information from the flyers.  Allow each group to meet to compare information and to also do more research to strengthen their point of view.   

Then discuss the format for the debate: 

Resolved: The British should impose taxes on the American Colonies.

Group 1: This is the “pro” group members are British and are for taxation.
 
Group 2: The “con” group members are colonist and do not agree with taxation.

1.  Each group will have seven uninterrupted minutes to present its case. Speakers should have a clear organized presentation. Three people from each group will do the presenting.                     

2.  After each group has spoken, groups have five minutes to get together and prepare a response to the first presentations (this is their chance to defend themselves).

3.  Two students from each group (different from the original presenters) now have five minutes to give the response for the group. 

 4.  After these responses, each group has three minutes to get together and prepare questions for the other side.

5.  Finally, 10 minutes will be allotted for open questions, during which time anyone from any side may ask or respond to questions.  After 10 minutes the debate will come to an end.

6. The teacher will award "telling points" for information presented correctly.  The side with the most telling points wins. 

 Assessments:

            Diagnostic assessment will be conducted through oral questioning.  Then the assessment for this second lesson plan will be based on the debate and the T-chart on the pros and cons of taxation.  The students will work in two different groups so students will have to present as a group.  The “telling points” will indicate whether there is a tie or a winning team.  Attached is a set of instructions for the debate as well as the graphic organizer that the students will use and will turn in for a grade.  A traditional assessment may also be used at the end of the entire unit. 


 

GRAPHIC ORGANIZER

                                                                                      Name_______________

 

DEBATE QUESTION: __________________________________________________________________

 

 

PRO

CON

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Name_________________________

Preparing for a classroom debate

Read the instructions bellow to familiarize with the classroom debate.  Meet with your group and begin organizing your team ideas using the graphic organizer.  Then during the debate you will be able to add as you hear the opponents’ comments.  Good Luck!

 Format for the debate: 

Topic for Debate: The British should impose taxes on the American Colonies.

Group 1: This is the “pro” group members are British and are for taxation.
 
Group 2: The “con” group members are colonist and do not agree with taxation.

1.  Each group will have seven uninterrupted minutes to present its case. Speakers should have a clear organized presentation. Three people from each group will do the presenting.           

2.  After each group has spoken, groups have five minutes to get together and prepare a response to the first presentations (this is their chance to defend themselves).

3. Two students from each group (different from the original presenters) now have five minutes to give the response for the group.

4.  After these responses, each group has three minutes to get together and prepare questions for the other side.  

5.  Finally, 10 minutes will be prearranged for open questions, during which time anyone from any side may ask or respond to questions.  After 10 minutes, the debate will come to an end.

6.  The teacher will award "telling points" for information presented correctly.  The side wirh the most telling points wins.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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